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“Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?” Interview Question [Examples]

This article will show you: 

  • What interviewers mean when they ask, “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?”
  • How to prepare examples of career goals for different interview situations.
  • Examples of best answers for the “where do you see yourself in 5 years” question.


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7 Unexpected Challenges of Working Overseas

With all the visa requirements, moving logistics, and endless paperwork, the details of the workplace are probably the last thing on your mind while researching life-changing job opportunities abroad, but working in a new culture can bring all kinds of pros, cons, and just quirky challenges of working overseas that you will have to get used to. Read on for a quick look at some surprising details on working in another country and the difficulties of living abroad

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The Three C's to Getting Any Job

There are three Cs to getting the kind of job you want and earning the kind of money you want to earn. These three Cs basically remain constant throughout your working career.

They are contacts, credibility, and competence.


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15 Important questions to ask before accepting a job abroad

International experience can be a great addition while developing your resume or CV. Working abroad is an effective way to experience life in another country while making a little money, extending your travels in ways that will forever change your life, and just plain enjoying yourself in the process. However, finding a job different from what you know can occasionally be full of pitfalls and surprises: dishonest employers, poor working conditions, or simply choosing a position that’s not suited to you or your way of life. While true horror stories do exist, they are rare, but if you are looking for a job abroad make sure you ask prospective employers the following questions and/or do your due diligence before you accept any job to help make your time abroad as rewarding as possible. 


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Etiquette in Saudi Arabia

Meeting Etiquette

  • Men shake hands. 
  • Women generally hug and kiss close friends.
  • Men and women would not greet each other in public from outside the family. 
  • When Saudis greet each other they take their time and converse about general things.

Gift Giving Etiquette

  • If you are invited to a Saudi's house bring something small as a thank you.
  • Flowers do not make good gifts from a man, although a woman could give them to her hostess.
  • Never give alcohol unless you are positive they partake.
  • Gifts are not opened when received.

Dining Etiquette

  • Saudis socialize primarily in restaurants and international hotels when entertaining expatriates whom they do not know well. After some time you will be invited to the home.
  • Entertainment will generally be same-sex only. If both sexes are included, they will be in separate rooms.

If you are invited to a Saudi's house: 

  • You would usually remove your shoes.
  • Dress conservatively.
  • Try to arrive at the invited time. Punctuality is appreciated but not crucial.
  • Show respect for the elders by greeting them first.
  • Accept the offer of Arabian coffee and dates even if you do not normally drink coffee.
  • If you are invited for a meal, understand that there will be a great deal of socializing and small talk before the meal is served.

Business Meeting Etiquette

  • Appointments are necessary and should be made several weeks to one month in advance if at all possible.
  • When meeting with government officials, a firm date will not be settled upon until you are physically in the country.
  • Try to schedule meetings in the morning.
  • You should arrive at meetings on time, although it is an accepted custom to keep foreigners waiting.
  • It is not uncommon to have a meeting cancelled once you arrive.
  • Meetings are generally not private until after a relationship of trust has been developed. This means you may expect frequent interruptions. Others may wander into the room and start a different discussion. You may join in, but do not try to bring the topic back to the original discussion until the new person leaves.
  • Business meetings start after prolonged inquiries about health, family, etc. Never inquire about a Saudi's wife.
  • Since Saudis will most likely judge you on appearances, dress and present yourself well.
  • Business women should make certain that their collarbones and knees are covered and that their clothes are not form-fitting.

Business Cards

  • Business cards are given to everyone you meet, although it may be an idea to be selective if you have few in your possession.
  • Have one side of your card translated into Arabic. Be sure to check the translation carefully as there is often confusion with the order of western names. 

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