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5 steps for transitioning into a new job

One of the most exciting challenges in a professional’s career is starting a new job. However, this can also be an incredibly stressful and demanding time.

It can be easy to feel overwhelmed but don't let that effect your performance. We've put together five easy steps to ensure the transition into your new role is as smooth as possible:


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Go and work abroad – it could have career benefits you never imagined

James Hipkiss writes about his experience working abroad and what he has gained from it. 


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Being the Boss in Brussels, Boston, and Beijing

Approaches to authority and decision making are not the only ways in which cultures differ, but they are arguably the most important in the leadership context. And if international managers confound the two, they will make mistakes in adapting their leadership styles to the cultures and situations at hand. The management approach that works in Lagos won’t be as effective in Stockholm.


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How to your new job in the first 90 days

When you’re in transition, your role is likely to shift —whether it means tackling new job responsibilities, working in a different environment or reporting to a new boss. Sometimes it can even be all of the above!

Regardless of your particular situation, it’s a crucial time. In fact, Watkins argues that impressing your manager and colleagues within the first 90 days is not only essential to your success in your current role but also for your overall career.


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Should you take an overseas job assignment?

Dear Annie: I am an engineer by training, currently running a big chunk of North American manufacturing for a global Fortune 500 company. Recently, the head of my division has been sounding me out about moving either to Spain, to tackle some productivity issues at a couple of plants we have there, or else to one of several Latin American countries where we are starting up new ventures. (I assume that these particular options are on the table because I’m of Hispanic extraction and already speak fluent Spanish.) I’m having trouble deciding whether to jump at either of these offers, and if so, which one. Moving overseas for a year or two would certainly be challenging and interesting. But friends of mine, who took similar assignments and later regretted doing so, warn me that I’d be “out of sight, out of mind” back at headquarters and that this would ultimately trip up my career. What do you think? 


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